David Lawrey & Jaki Middleton

The world's more interesting with you in it

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    The world's more interesting with you in it, 2009, video sculpture.

     

    A commissioned work for the exhibition Reality Check: Watching Sylvania Waters at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery, The world's more interesting with you in it (2009) re-creates the Sylvania Waters house as a miniaturised three-dimensional scale model. Recessed into the gallery wall, the model references anthropological museum display conventions, where important historical events and scenes from the natural world are represented. By rendering the famous house in this way, comparisons are drawn between the voyeurism the family experienced with the ironic manner in which these constructed worlds are intended to depict animals in their natural environment – but are by design highly manipulated. The artists appear in the work as ghostly figures that intermittently appear and disappear around the house, haunting the implied inhabitants. The ‘ghosting’ is achieved by employing an effect called Pepper’s Ghost where an object is reflected into the scene through the use of reflective glass and specific lighting.

     

    - Daniel Mudie Cunningham

The world's more interesting with you in it, 2009,

video sculpture.

 

A commissioned work for the exhibition Reality Check: Watching Sylvania Waters at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery, The world's more interesting with you in it (2009) re-creates the Sylvania Waters house as a miniaturised three-dimensional scale model. Recessed into the gallery wall, the model references anthropological museum display conventions, where important historical events and scenes from the natural world are represented. By rendering the famous house in this way, comparisons are drawn between the voyeurism the family experienced with the ironic manner in which these constructed worlds are intended to depict animals in their natural environment – but are by design highly manipulated. The artists appear in the work as ghostly figures that intermittently appear and disappear around the house, haunting the implied inhabitants. The ‘ghosting’ is achieved by employing an effect called Pepper’s Ghost where an object is reflected into the scene through the use of reflective glass and specific lighting.

 

- Daniel Mudie Cunningham